HR Brief – September 2017

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Updated Form I-9 Required Beginning Sept. 18

On July 17, 2017, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, issued an updated version of Form I-9: Employment Eligibility Verification (Form I-9). Under federal law, every employer that recruits, refers for a fee or hires an individual for employment in the United States must complete a Form I-9.

The updated form replaces a version that was issued in 2016. Employers may continue using the 2016 form until Sept. 17, 2017. Exclusive use of the updated form is expected by Sept. 18, 2017. The new form expires on Aug. 31, 2019.

The updated Form I-9 includes revisions to the instructions and to the list of acceptable documents, but does not include substantive revisions for completing the Form I-9. Visit the USCIS website for more information regarding USCIS or the new Form I-9.

Revisions Snapshot

The following are only some of the changes made to the Form I-9:

  • Changed the name of the Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices to its new name, Immigrant and Employee Rights Section.
  • Removed “the end of” from the phrase “the first day of employment.”
  • Renumbered all List C documents except the Social Security card.
  • Combined all the certifications of report of birth issued by the Department of State (Form FS-545, Form DS-1350 and Form FS-240) into selection C #2 in List C.

For a complete list of changes, or for more information on how these changes might impact your organization, please contact your Employee Benefit Advisors, Inc. representative today.

Harder Than Ever to Fill Jobs in U.S.

It currently takes an average of 31 days to fill a position vacancy in the United States, according to a recent report by Deutsche Bank. This is the longest span ever, contrasted against 15 days to fill a job in 2009.

As if to confirm the report, the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) recently said 85 percent of employers claim to have few or no qualified applicants.

Additionally, the NFIB reported earlier this year that 33 percent of small businesses could not fill a job vacancy from the previous month.

Experts pointed out that wages might be a contributing factor in the “tight” labor market. Some employers have quickly filled positions with qualified candidates simply by offering better wages.

To discuss strategies for strengthening your recruitment efforts, please contact your Employee Benefit Advisors, Inc. representative.